Parenting

PHOTO: COURTESY SUZANNE HAYES I walk through the front door and excitedly confront the mess before me. I’ve spent the past few days awaiting this moment: the moment I can finally catch up on life. The laundry piles are high, the dishwasher is full of clean dishes to put away, and the sink is overflowing
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Photo: Sheri Segal Glick I hate making dinner, I hate planning dinner and I hate foraging for ingredients. I hate all of it. Because hiring a personal chef wasn’t a practical solution for my family, I subscribed to a website that designs healthy, family-friendly meal plans for the week, thinking that it would solve some
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Photo: iStockphoto 1. Have a plan Write down all your holiday expenses, including presents, gift wrap, groceries and entertainment. From there you can develop a budget, divide your funds and track your spending along the way. 2. Use tech to shop the sales From toys to food to gifting supplies, everything goes on sale—the key
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Photo: iStockphoto The Government of British Columbia has put an end to “birth alerts” — a practice that allows hospital staff to alert child welfare workers that a newborn may be at risk for harm, without informing expectant parents. This practice, which can lead to traumatic child apprehensions soon after delivery, disproportionately impacts Indigenous women.
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Amassing napkins, tea lights and random pieces of glassware (don’t make me explain, just enjoy the options when I’m making you a cocktail) is my standard strategy for trips to Ikea. (That and the staple soft ice cream cone I ravage while raging around the parking lot looking for my car.) 25 best things to
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Illustration: Holly Stapleton When my two kids were little, I felt I had to inhale every moment with them. Every time they tasted something new, every time they fell off a swing—you don’t get those moments back, which meant everything else had to wait so I could be present for them. I resisted pursuing a
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Photo: iStockphoto On our daily 10-minute walk to my son’s school in Toronto’s west end, we pass a number of familiar sights: a couple of small dogs (a Boston terrier named Happ and a chihuahua named Milo); a grubby parkette littered with ancient, sun-bleached toys; the malodorous dumpster behind the seafood shop; the somewhat less
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