Children’s Health

Social and community disruptions caused by the COVID-19 restrictions could have a lasting effect on child wellbeing, Flinders University researchers warn. While health, safety and education responses are the focus of restrictions, the needs of childhood independence, self-determination and play are less acknowledged, Flinders University experts explain in a new publication. Play is a key
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A new literature analysis published in Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics, the peer-reviewed journal of The College of Optometrists, gives eye care practitioners (ECPs) a comprehensive analysis of evidence-based information needed to help manage myopia. Written by Dr. Mark Bullimore and Dr. Kathryn Richdale, “Myopia Control 2020: Where are we and where are we heading?” presents
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.May 11 2020 A new study has shown that for some patients with type 1 diabetes the close monitoring of their condition using telehealth protocols combined with appropriate technology may lead to better care during the COVID-19 pandemic, when patients are avoiding in-person visits. The study, which found that telehealth monitoring
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Not surprisingly, a new statement from the American Heart Association (AHA) notes that children who eat healthily grow up to be adults with little risk of obesity and heart disease. The statement was from the American Heart Association’s Council on Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health; Epidemiology and Prevention; and Cardiovascular Disease in the Young; the Council
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.May 9 2020 A Texas A&M AgriLife Research team has good news for patients with copper-deficiency disorders, especially young children diagnosed with Menkes disease. A team led by James Sacchettini, Ph.D. professor and Welch Chair of Science, and Vishal Gohil, Ph.D., associate professor, both from the Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics
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A new viewpoint article from Harvard Medical School, published in the journal JAMA Pediatrics, discusses the hesitancy to include children in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) clinical trials, potentially diminishing their therapeutic options in the long run. A recently discovered severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the cause of an ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, has raised
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Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a rare inflammatory bowel disease, primarily affects premature infants and is a leading cause of death in the smallest and sickest of these patients. The exact cause remains unclear, and there is no effective treatment. No test can definitively diagnose the devastating condition early, so infants with suspected NEC are carefully monitored
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Teenagers who have obesity, type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure may be more likely to have signs of premature blood vessel aging compared to teens without those health conditions, according to new research published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access journal of the American Heart Association. Over five
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Among the countries that have successfully “flattened the curve” and managed to contain the coronavirus, is Australia. The country has managed to keep the viral transmission at bay and has now lifted some restrictions to let its residents return to more normal lives. Along with easing restrictions, the Australian Government launched the COVIDsafe app to
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Apr 29 2020 Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) committed $13.6 million to stand up a large-scale research collaboration between UC San Francisco (UCSF), Stanford University, and the Chan Zuckerberg Biohub (CZ Biohub) that aims to better understand the spread of COVID-19 across the San Francisco Bay Area. Over the next
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The immune responses of a female mouse before pregnancy can predict how likely her offspring are to have behavioral deficits if the immune system is activated during pregnancy, according to researchers from the Center for Neuroscience at the University of California, Davis. The findings, published April 23 in the journal Brain, Behavior, and Immunity, could
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